Posts Tagged ‘terrorism’

What’s your take?

 

Airplane Confusion

Gothamist had this article about Jews wearing tefillin called

“Tefillin Totin’ Jews Terrorize Another Airplane”

Dramatic, right?

It’s the comments on that article that intrigued me:

– Don’t people understand that Jews do not directly involve themselves in a terror scheme… They let the American CIA do it for them.
Sheesh!

In reponse to above: Have you always been stupid or was there a time, maybe in the second grade, when a teacher told you that there was “promise”? Educate yourself, you fool.

Response back: Do I educate myself by first ignoring the uncomfortable bedfellows that is Israel & the CIA? Ignorance is bliss, HO. I think you might need some educating, too. I loved 2nd grade.

– If you’ve never seen the ritual, it’s pretty scary/intense, especially on a plane. I’m a jew and it still creeps me out.

– hey, all you religious nuts, keep your prayers at home in the church or temple…any one tying boxes to their heads on a plane needs to have their heads examined. so irresponsible…religious fools.
Response: Have you seen how Jews are able to control their women? It’s definitely the best religion for that.

– There’s a time and place for everything. Inflexibility is the Orthodox creed. In today’s world public safety must trump religious ritual every time. With this said, I smell a freedom of religion suit with these facts reaching the Supreme Court in about 5 years. Watch for it.

– Judaism allows for flexibility in a lot of things. Those who insist on putting on Tefillin on a airplane should find a loophole…Judaism is full of them. And besides, standing up during a flight is not only dangerous for the people doing it, it puts others at risk too.

– Some day we will get over religion and its superstitions and work on evolving as a society.
In response: No we won’t. It’s too easy to pretend there’s some supernatural daddy figure in the sky telling you what’s right and wrong so you never have to take responsibility and think for yourself. And most people, whether it’s in their private lives or professional or anywhere else, will do what’s easiest no matter what the consequences.

– Agreed! Wait until you get off the plane to perform the prayer rituals.

-Hitler would be proud.
In response: Godwin would not. (awesome reference!)

– I’ve never understood loud religious rituals at all. If you’re praying to an almighty deity, surely he’ll hear you even if you whisper or just think your prayers. There’s no correlation between true, heartfelt piety and aural volume anyway. Often, the people who are the loudest with their “hallelujahs” and “praise the Lord” are the least pious. For example, Pat Robertson, Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker, the Westboro freaks – the list goes on and on.

– While I don’t think these guys are getting supernatural powers from “tefillin'” I certainly think it is a bit ridiculous that people freak out whenever anyone who isn’t white does some of their religious mumbo-jumbo. Pray the rosary: those beads are okay. pray with tefillin & suddenly DUN DUN DUN. TERROR!

– Hilarious.


"In Memory of the 5 Family Members from the Settlement of Itamar Who Were Killed In Cold Blood"

Itamar Family Massacre. No need to post a link, because if you haven’t heard about it, shame on you. Not much to say. A animal goes in to the home of another person and slits the throats of both parents, a 3 month old baby and two other siblings.

As a child I used to ask my mom who gave the Nazis the “right” to kill people. I couldn’t understand that there were people who would violate the basic right of living on this planet – that is to respect anothers right to live.

Some things I can’t relate to, but I understand that there is an explanation. Say soldiers who won’t be afraid to die in battlefield, or maybe they will be, but nonetheless they’ll go out and fight. I can’t quite grasp how fear doesn’t overtake them, but then again, I’m not a soldier for that reason.  I understand that others are different than I may be, have different fears, hopes, dreams. Different things make them happy, fulfilled.

But certain keep on reading

I’ve pasted an article from the NY times.

I guess Muslims, like Jews refuse to believe that one who leaves religion is a rational person. I’ve put that which I thought important or similar to the Jewish OTD, in blue.

QALQILYA, West Bank — It is hard to imagine that a dingy Internet cafe buzzing with flies in this provincial Palestinian town could have spawned a blogger who has angered the Muslim cyberworld by promoting atheism, composing spoofs of Koranic verses, skewering the lifestyle of the Prophet Muhammad and chatting online using the sarcastic Web name God Almighty.

But many people in Qalqilya seem convinced that this Facebook apostate is none other than a secretive young man who spent seven hours a day in the corner booth of a back-street hole-in-the-wall here. Until recently the man, Waleed Hasayin, in his mid-20s, led a relatively anonymous existence as an unemployed graduate in computer science who helped out a few hours a day at his father’s one-chair barber shop. Several acquaintances described him as an “ordinary guy” who prayed at the mosque on Fridays.

But since the end of October Mr. Hasayin has been detained at the local Palestinian Authority intelligence headquarters, suspected of being the blasphemous blogger who goes by the name Waleed al-Husseini. The case has drawn attention to thorny issues like freedom of expression in the Palestinian Authority, for which insulting religion is considered illegal, and the cultural collision between a conservative society and the Internet.

While Mr. Hasayin has won some admiration and support abroad — a Facebook group has formed in solidarity, along with several online petitions — others on Facebook are calling for his execution.

In his hometown, the reaction seems to be one of uniform fury. Many here say that if he does not repent, he should spend the rest of his life in jail.

“Everyone is a Muslim here, so everyone is against what he did,” said Alaa Jarar, 20, who described himself as not particularly pious. “People are mad at him and will not respect the Palestinian Authority if he is released. Maybe he is a Mossad agent working for Israel.”

Aside from his Facebook pages, which have now been deleted, Mr. Husseini, the online persona, also posted essays in Arabic on a blog called Noor al-Aqel (Enlightenment of Reason) and in English translation on Proud Atheist, identifying himself as “an atheist from Jerusalem — Palestine.”

The essays offer some relatively sophisticated arguments in a blunt and racy style. In one, titled “Why I left Islam,” Mr. Husseini wrote that Muslims “believe anyone who leaves Islam is an agent or a spy for a Western State, namely the Jewish State.”

He added, “They actually don’t get that people are free to think and believe in whatever suits them.”

He went on to describe the Islamic God as “a primitive, Bedouin and anthropomorphic God,” and Muhammad as “a sex maniac” who bent his own rules “to appease his voracious desire.”

It all seems a far cry from Qalqilya, a conservative low-rise town of more than 40,000 people where horse-drawn wagons plied the streets this week and the market was bustling ahead of the Muslim holiday marking the end of the annual pilgrimage in Mecca, Saudi Arabia.

The arrest of Mr. Hasayin has caused a sensation since it was first reported by the independent Palestinian news agency Maan. But there are also some who question whether he could have written all this material alone.

Mr. Hasayin’s father, Khaled, was reluctant to talk. Clearly upset and ashamed, he said that his son was in treatment and had been “bewitched” by a Tunisian woman he had met via Facebook.

Before shooing reporters out of his barber shop, where a framed Koranic verse hung on the wall above tubs of hair gel, he said that his son’s literary Arabic was not at a level where he could compose fake Koranic verses.

One relative of Mr. Hasayin said, “It is true he studied computers, but he is not a philosopher.”

At the local intelligence headquarters, officials seemed to be treading carefully. Speaking on the condition of anonymity because of the case’s potentially explosive nature — Salman Rushdie’s “Satanic Verses” led to riots and death threats in the 1980s, as did cartoons of Muhammad in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten in 2005 — the officials said they could not release any details since Mr. Hasayin was still under interrogation. They said they had to act fairly and with sensitivity in case the suspicions proved false or exaggerated.

They said Mr. Hasayin had not been allowed any visitors and told them that he did not need a lawyer. Mr. Hasayin, they added, was being detained partly for his own protection.

Palestinian human rights groups in the West Bank have so far remained silent about Mr. Hasayin’s arrest. But Majed Arouri, a human rights expert in Ramallah, said he believed that the way in which Mr. Hasayin had been detained and his correspondence recorded “contradicts human rights principles and existing Palestinian laws” regarding individual privacy.

If Mr. Hasayin is to be tried, Mr. Arouri said, it would be according to a 1960 Jordanian law against defaming religion, still valid in the West Bank.

Some bloggers are already comparing Mr. Hasayin, or Mr. Husseini, to Kareem Amer, an Egyptian blogger who was sentenced in 2007 to four years’ imprisonment for insulting Islam and the Egyptian president.

At the Internet cafe that Mr. Hasayin frequented, youths played online billiards and looked at pictures of girls on a recent afternoon. The owner, Ahmed Abu Asab, said that six weeks ago he discovered that Mr. Hasayin was “not a regular client.”

Mr. Abu Asab had grown suspicious because Mr. Hasayin would not let anybody come close and see what he was working on. Mr. Abu Asab said: “At first I thought he was looking at pornographic sites and chatting with girls. That would be normal and none of my business.”

But Mr. Abu Asab said he used software that allowed him to check what the client was up to, and among other things, he came across the Facebook page on which Mr. Hasayin appeared to be speaking in the name of God. Mr. Abu Asab said that he and three friends knew what was going on and that “maybe somebody” informed the authorities.

Mr. Abu Asab kept copies of the pages, and Palestinian Authority officials came and downloaded the material. Next, they came for Mr. Hasayin, who asked for a moment to close what was on his screen.

Yea. Wtf.

“The fact that a believer is happier than a skeptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one.” George Bernard Shaw

Debatable. Interesting quote nonetheless. I don’t think believers are drunk at all. I respect those who believe and follow a certain path, be it Orthodoxy, Christianity, Islam, Liberalism or any other belief system. Unless of course their belief includes blowing people up in the name of religion or killing people because they are somehow inferior to you. In which case they’re drunk with a belief and can’t see outside the box. And assholes.

There is a point to be made however. Along with certain belief systems comes a set of rules. Rules are great as they can provide a system within which one can thrive. However they are a bit like inheriting a house. You can’t choose what the house looks like, unless of course you redo it, in which case it’s no longer the same house. You have two choices. Sell the house and reap the benefits, or convince yourself you actually like it. Possibly that style home will even be adapted as your own taste.

Rules are given. They can be dropped, or they can be adopted as your own. Which means you must come to terms with those rules. You must adapt them as your own, otherwise you’re simply a slave to those rules.

The thing with adopting rules as your own is that coming to terms with rules may not necessarily include truly believing in them. You can just begin following and becoming comfortable with those rules, but then you won’t be thinking for yourself.

Take morals for instance. What is moral and what is immoral? According to the Jewish religion if you see something that belongs to your friend laying around, and you know that person wouldn’t mind, you still can’t use it because you don’t have explicit permission. Now most people would agree there’s nothing wrong with using it. So if you’re going to follow a rule blindly, being a moral person doesn’t actually mean you’re moral. It means you DO MORAL THINGS. The morals of an institution can create the same effect on a person as alcohol. It can create a illusion of safety, provide a mask with which to hide behind.

The more one figures out what ones comfort zone is, the more creative he’ll think. The realization that you can do what you want is freeing. Obviously if everyone yells at you that you’re doing the  wrong thing, in all likelihood you are. Common sense is a prerequisite to all. But the greatest people in history have always been those who thought out of the box. Created their own success. Those who didn’t say I want be successful, but I WILL be successful. Obviously you may not end up reaching your goal but if you don’t believe you will, you won’t. If you believe you will, you may.

Energy is out there you just gotta capture it, and allow it to help you break free of the constraints of the masses plodding along through  life. So many people I met had resumes that said one thing about them: They’re a robotic douche with no ambition, they can use excel and worked at a Fortune 500 company. Not saying I’m any better, but at least I don’t pretend. Nah I kid, I’m way better. I’m awesome.

jew Pictures, Images and Photos
My friend posted on facebook asking where she should move. I said “Gaza, I heard they have an awesome beach”. She responded it was too far. I said “I heard there is another ship headed out, you can hitch.” This dude comments ” Don’t listen to that communist jew bastard! Miami is where it’s at!” I right away wrote ” noone. calls. me. a. communist. jew. bastard. You have something to vent, i’ll give you my address.” A few people called that guy out.

He later responds: “Sorry I just got offended by jokes being made about the nine people being killed in international waters trying to provide humantarian aid to 2 millon displaced refugees. I just didn’t think that was very funny. Israels greatest threat is knowledge I guess I’m a loser because I read books!” I responded to him: “It’s a naval blockade during which they could have followed directions and had the supplies delivered after they had been checked by security yet they intentionally chose to be confrontational.”

What I really wanted to say was: My cousins- the ones evacuated from Gaza 5 yrs ago are the displaced refugees. The people who moved in their place- they unfortunately have leaders who shelled sderot and the beach where people were trying to relax on. They also blew up the bus my cousins father in law was on, killing him. So we, Israel, locked them in and cut off supplies. Its called an embargo. Noone tries to bring aid of any sort there. If they do- we stop them. And we do feel sorry for the activists we killed, but they tried to smash our brains out as we turned the boat away.